This Week in Internet Marketing: 6/13/08

  June 13, 2008   Category :     Search Engine Optimization | SEO,   SEO Link Building   information

Author : Henry Adaso
Internet Copywriter

Links
Oh boy, what a week it’s been in SEO land. In the past few days or so, we’ve seen the launch of a revamped version of Google Trends, the rise of Plurk, the all-around drop in traffic, and some SEO battle between the websites of our two presidential candidates.

Google Trends – The search engine behemoth we all know as Google has added yet another fun little tool to make our Internet experience a lot more exciting. You can now rely on Google Trends to predict the future of your business.

Plurk – It seems there’s at least 1 new social media site (or 10!) out every day. Plurk, the Twitter-like networking portal, is the latest to hit the web. I can’t complain, though; that just means one more social media tool for all of us.

Candidates’ Sites – The SEO watchdogs at Search Engine Land couldn’t wait for the inevitable presidential debates to point out the differences between John McCain and Barack Obama. Their post on the layout differences between JohnMcCain.com and BarackObama.com stirred up an interesting debate on Sphinn.

Link Building – And what’s an SEO week without some pointers on link building? We paused to examine 10 ways to get natural links for search engine optimization.

Traffic Plunge – If you suddenly noticed a traffic plunge, you’re not alone. Many high PageRank sites have seen a huge loss in traffic this past week. Most of these pages are still being indexed, even if their PR values have taken a hit. There are several reasons why you may be losing traffic, but that’s a topic for another day.

For now, continue in your path towards SEO nirvana by creating high-quality content, relying on natural link building techniques, and staying ahead of your competitors in the SEO rankings race.

About The Author

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

Comments are closed.